Arizona Legislative Internship in Phoenix

Earn credit while growing your network

Work on special projects, present before legislative committees, and expand your professional network all while earning a paycheck and academic credit. 

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Snapshot of detailed architecture at the Arizona State Capitol

Live the Legislative Process

Gain real work experience while working as a legislative intern

The Arizona State Legislature convenes into session on the second Monday of January every year at the State Capitol. During this time, they address the state’s most pressing public policy issues and pass a state budget. Students from every degree area at each of the three universities across Arizona are invited to apply for 50 paid positions each session under the Arizona Legislative Internship Program. 

 

About the Program

As a legislative intern, students will work at the State Capitol in Phoenix full-time for the duration of the Spring semester. This internship should be treated like a full-time job, typical hours are scheduled from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm Monday through Friday. UA grants academic credit for successful completion of the program.

Interns assist with the policy-making process, and deal with issues such as healthcare, education, transportation, environment, elections and agriculture. You may apply to five different state agencies:

 

Application Requirements

The Arizona State Legislature requires interested applicants to meet all the following requirements:

  • Be an undergraduate or graduate student at the time of their application

  • Have a 3.0 GPA

  • Be on track to complete 75 units of credit by the end of 2019

  • Complete and submit an application by Wednesday, September 25 at 5:00 PM.

 

"This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to expand your network, collaborate as a member of a team, and participate in enacting public policy that impacts all Arizonans."

- Robert C. Robbins, President

Frequently Asked

No. Students from all majors and disciplines are encouraged to apply. Former interns’ majors have included communications, religious studies, ecology and evolutionary biology, economics, finance, media arts and psychology, among others. Legislative Staff trains, supervises and mentors interns at all times.

There are two rounds of panel interviews. Campus interviews are conducted in October to determine which candidates will be interviewed at the State Capitol by the Legislative Selection Committee. Interviews at the State Capitol are the last week in October. Interns are selected and notified in November.

There are between 40 and 50 interns who serve in various capacities at the Senate and House of Representatives.

OFFICE OF THE GOVERNOR.

As an intern for the Office of the Governor, students will have the opportunity to attend meetings with the Governor’s senior staff, policy advisors and members of the Legislature. Intern responsibilities include maintaining complete files for each bill under consideration by the Legislature. Covering all legislative committee hearings, caucus meetings, floor sessions and preparing comprehensive notes for review by the Governor’s staff, monitor the progress of bills and create reports, complete bill packets for review by policy advisors and, ultimately, the Governor. Interns will also have the opportunity to visit various state agencies to gain a broader understanding of state government and develop in-depth knowledge on a wide range of issues facing the state. Additional internship positions may be available in offices overseen by the Governor’s Office.

 

ARIZONA SUPREME COURT.

Interns for the Supreme Court will work directly with the Legislative Affairs team within the Administrative Office. The primary responsibilities include assisting with legislation pertaining to the judicial department and other administrative responsibilities. In addition, interns are required to attend court and legislative committee meetings; assist the Legislative team in preparing, testifying, researching and tracking legislation that impact the courts; act as a liaison to the Legislature; and communicate with judges and administrative staff on legislative activity. Interns will be required to prepare written materials (e.g., fact sheets, legislative summaries and letters) and make oral presentations on proposed legislation to court committees and staff. Interns may also be given the opportunity to lobby legislators on select proposals. This position requires research, writing and word processing skills as well as strong communication and organizational skills.

 

ARIZONA STATE SENATE.

Interns for the Arizona Senate may be chosen to serve on non-partisan, Republican or Democratic staff. Regardless of placement, interns will experience the legislative process firsthand. Legislative interns will have the opportunity to work with lawmakers, lobbyists and committees, getting an exclusive, behind-the-scenes perspective on Arizona politics that is unparalleled to any other internship. Depending on their placement, interns work with partisan staff on issues important to their respective parties or analyze public policy for members of a legislative committee. Duties may include conducting research, writing legislative summaries, presenting in committee hearings, briefing senators and representatives, preparing amendments and communicating with legislators and constituents.

 

ARIZONA HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.

Like the Arizona Senate, interns for the House of Representatives may serve on non-partisan, Republican or Democratic staff. House interns experience firsthand the process and conversations that create legislation and public policy for the entire State of Arizona. Legislative interns have the opportunity to work with lawmakers, lobbyists and committees, getting an exclusive, behind-the-scenes perspective on Arizona politics that is unparalleled to any other internship. Depending on their placement, interns work with partisan staff on issues important to their respective parties or analyze public policy for members of a legislative committee. Duties may include conducting research, writing legislative summaries, presenting in committee hearings, briefing senators and representatives, preparing amendments and communicating with legislators and constituents.

 

ARIZONA CAPITOL TELEVISION.

As an intern for Arizona Capitol Television, students receive an exclusive look into the legislative process while developing their television production, journalism and communication skills. This internship offers qualified students a chance to learn about the legislative process and the impact it has on the state. Interns will be taught to produce and manage daily video coverage of legislative proceedings and feature video segments for cable television. As a broadcast intern, you will operate robotic cameras to produce live legislative proceedings, research, write, shoot, edit, and produce video segments for Arizona Capitol Television, conduct television interviews with legislators and their staff, and learn about broadcast journalism and television production.

 

OFFICE OF THE ATTORNEY GENERAL.

As an intern for the Arizona Attorney General’s Office, students will have the unique opportunity to work closely with senior staff and play an integral role in the legislative efforts of this office. Interns provide critical information to Attorney General Brnovich and other prosecutors in the state. Expectations of this Office include analyzing all pertinent bills and organizing bill information and materials into comprehensive files. Interns will attend legislative hearings to review and report back on legislation as it moves through the process. As an intern, you must attend weekly meetings with Division Chiefs and key staff members as well as attend and participate in daily meetings with the legislative team. Interns are an important component of the legislative team and will often attend stakeholder meetings and meet with legislators.

The internship lasts for 18 weeks during the spring semester, beginning the first week of January. Interns receive a $5,000 stipend, plus a tuition/fee waiver and credit hours. Students from outside Maricopa County may be eligible for reimbursement of moving expenses up to $1,000 (with receipts).

Interns normally begin work at 8:00 a.m. and work until 5:00 p.m. or until their work is complete, whichever is later. Interns generally work long hours, so additional coursework and second jobs are not encouraged.

No. Reimbursement of up to $1,000 is available for students from outside Maricopa County, but interns are responsible for setting up their own housing.

Yes. Many former interns have succeeded in obtaining positions at various state agencies, with lobbying groups, law firms and the private sector. Several former interns are currently on permanent staff with the House of Representatives and the Senate and some have gone to various federal agencies in Washington, D.C.

Yes! Letter writers wishing to submit letters of recommendation directly to internship coordinators are encouraged to email letters to legislativeintern@email.arizona.edu. They should indicate in the body of the email for whom the letter is written (first and last name). Otherwise, students can submit received letters of recommendation via the online application.

 

Questions?

 

For additional information or questions about the Legislative Internship Program, please contact our team at legislativeintern@email.arizona.edu or click below.

 

 

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